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According to a recent article published on RFP Magazine, there are many differences between Property Managers and Facility Managers.

  1. Facility Managers stay alert, their goal is to work actively to manage the space so that it better suits the needs of its users, while property managers work with a more passive or reactive style.
  2. Property Manager are the building’s owner agents, so there work centers on operating the building to provide profits for the owner.  This includes tasks such as paying bills, collecting rents, coordinating repairs, bid out services, utilities and taxes, strive to keep the property full with occupants, develop a budget for capital improvements and more.
  3. On the other hand, a Facility Manager is the management of a business agent, so they work with a broader perspective for example: their concern is not just occupied office space, but also all the things required to make the space productive for the employees, like temperature, lighting, filing, storage, meeting space,furniture and fixtures, floor plan, etc. Facility Managers focus more on providing workers with the environment they need in order to be as productive as possible so that the space and its contents don’t interfere with the tasks the employees need to complete.

This means that the responsibilities of Facility Managers and Property Managers can sometimes be counterproductive, creating tensions. For example, the Facility Managers get work orders from the occupants stating that the temperature is either too hot, too cold, or noise level being too loud, no power, etc. So accordingly the FM may order special cleaning, or new paper towels in the restrooms, trash removal or new hours or to operate the HVAC longer than currently scheduled, etc. While the PM will be looking for ways to ways to keep the focus on the efficiency of all the building’s operations, like adjusting the HVAC operating hours, turning lights off, modifying cleaning schedules, and changing paper goods to either save money, go green, etc.